Peer reviewed analysis from world leading experts

Governing China

Volume 3, No 2: April - June, 2011

The wide range of contributions to this collection examine ‘governing China’, including ‘the government’ at its various levels, but also all those issues covered by the expanding vocabulary of governance, social management, harmonious society, civil society, and new development models. We look at social change — in particular, the frequently misunderstood role of the emerging middle-class and its interests; the role of nationalism as a factor impacting upon both domestic and foreign-policy; and reform of governance in public finance and state-owned enterprises, as well as crucial elements in the overall task of ‘governing China’. This has not been a good year for continued progress in the direction of greater liberalisation of the political system, wider press freedoms or a truly independent judiciary, all essential components of the sort of China sought by its best minds for well over a century. At the same time, the number of individual citizens who have announced they will run for district people’s congresses in elections — despite admonitory comments from some official sources — between July and december 2012 is one encouraging reminder that China’s reality is complex.
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The wide range of contributions to this collection examine ‘governing China’, including ‘the government’ at its various levels, but also all those issues covered by the expanding vocabulary of governance, social management, harmonious society, civil society, and new development models. We look at social change — in particular, the frequently misunderstood role of the emerging middle-class and its interests; the role of nationalism as a factor impacting upon both domestic and foreign-policy; and reform of governance in public finance and state-owned enterprises, as well as crucial elements in the overall task of ‘governing China’. This has not been a good year for continued progress in the direction of greater liberalisation of the political system, wider press freedoms or a truly independent judiciary, all essential components of the sort of China sought by its best minds for well over a century. At the same time, the number of individual citizens who have announced they will run for district people’s congresses in elections — despite admonitory comments from some official sources — between July and december 2012 is one encouraging reminder that China’s reality is complex.

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